When Art meets Design meets Eco-Friendly some of the most amazing births occur. Furnishings do not have to be just utilitarian. Furniture can double as an artistic sculpture worthy of being a museum piece. Build the sculpture using recycled materials and achieve a true masterpiece for any abode.

Emecohas developed beautiful chairs using 80% recycled aluminum, taking 77 steps to get to the finished product that is truly sustainable designed to last for 150 years.

the Navy chair

Emico is 100% made in the United States and has a strict Environmental Policy.

  • Committed to sustainability and protecting the environment.
  • Emeco uses post consumer and post industrial waste to create chairs intended to last decades.
  • Emeco is committed to minimizing their impact on the environment by choosing materials, methods and processes that offer the least risk to our environment.
  • They utilize the best available control technologies to reduce air emissions where needed, recycling waste and used materials at every opportunity, eliminating other impacts to the environment, such as releases to surface water, and reducing the carbon footprint of our products to minimum achievable levels.
  • Whenever possible they select energy sources that will have the lowest impact on the environment, such as electricity from renewable resources.

It all began in 1944 with Emeco’s (Electric Machine and Equipment Company) 1006 Navy chair. “The chair was commissioned in the 1940s by the U.S. Navy in World War II for use on warships: the contract specified that it had to be able to withstand torpedo blasts to the side of a destroyer. Together with Alcoa (Aluminum Company of America) experts, Emeco’s founder, Witton C. “Bud” Dinges designed the 1006, a chair so durable that it far exceeded the Navy’s specifications: When Dinges threw one chair out of a sixth-floor window at a Chicago furniture show, it survived undamaged except for a few scratches. Most wartime chairs are still in perfect condition and are occasionally available on the U.S. civilian market as military surplus from mothballed Navy ships.” (Source Wikipedia)

According to the Emeco website all of their furnishings are Handmade, Turning 80% recycled Aluminum into classic chairs.

  • To make just one chair it takes 50 hands 8 hours.
  • And if you want it polished, that’s another 8 hours.
  • Being made by hand makes every chair unique.

    the Navy chair looks beautiful in any room

“Look underneath a few. Some welds may be more buzzed than burred. Others more burred than buzzed. It’s not a mistake. It’s human. “It’s what makes an Emeco chair, an Emeco chair.”

They now have many other chair styles to offer along with their original Navy Chair. Emeco has added tables to complement their seating and have collaborated with top Designers for works of art.

In 2006 Coca-Cola came to Emeco looking for ways to show the value of recycled plastic. Everywhere else in the world people recycle about 80% of their bottles while in the US we recycled only about 20%.

  • Coke wanted them to develop a way to make the “Navy Chair” out of recycled plastic bottles, rPET (Recycled Polyethylene Terephthalate). Emeco, along with BASF the international chemical innovator, developed a way to produce a chair out of the recycled plastic combined with color pigment and glass fiber.

 

The 111 Navy Chair was born.

“The goal of the 111 Navy project was to alter consumer behavior by illustrating the value of rPET with beautifully designed and everyday products – ultimately encouraging more recycling.”

  • Navy 111 chair in different colors

    The 111 chairs come in an array of colors for a fun turn on the original Navy Chair.

We need to learn from Emeco that everyone can make an impact on our environment. We have become a throw away world overwhelming ourselves with garbage. It is time to invent additional ways to reuse in order to sustain our environment for the future generations.

Have fun coming up with innovative ideas to recycle, reuse, and repurpose.

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